merzbo-derek

(tableaux exotiques & odalisques beat)
(natures mortes & musiques fictives)
"I never discuss the plots of my films. I never release a synopsis before I begin shooting. How could I? Until the film is edited, I have no idea myself what it will be about. And perhaps not even then. Perhaps the film will only be a mood, or a statement about a style of life. Perhaps it has no plot at all. I depart from the script constantly. I may film scenes I had no intention of filming; things suggest themselves on location, and we improvise. I try not to think about it too much. Then, in the cutting room, I take the film and start to put it together and only then do I begin to get an idea of what it is about." — Michelangelo Antonioni on his filmmaking process
Still from L’Avventura (1960)

"I never discuss the plots of my films. I never release a synopsis before I begin shooting. How could I? Until the film is edited, I have no idea myself what it will be about. And perhaps not even then. Perhaps the film will only be a mood, or a statement about a style of life. Perhaps it has no plot at all. I depart from the script constantly. I may film scenes I had no intention of filming; things suggest themselves on location, and we improvise. I try not to think about it too much. Then, in the cutting room, I take the film and start to put it together and only then do I begin to get an idea of what it is about." — Michelangelo Antonioni on his filmmaking process

Still from L’Avventura (1960)

(Source: salesonfilm, via adeerhunter)

Heat (Michael Mann, 1995) / Pacific (Alex Colville, 1967)

(Source: adeerhunter)


 The Deer Hunter - All scenes involving John Cazale, who had terminal cancer, had to be filmed first. Because of his illness, the studio initially wanted to get rid of him, but Streep, whom he was dating at the time, and Cimino threatened to walk away if they did. He was also uninsurable, and according to Streep, De Niro paid for his insurance because he wanted him in the film. This was his last film, as he died shortly after filming wrapped. Cazale never saw the finished film.
The Deer Hunter - All scenes involving John Cazale, who had terminal cancer, had to be filmed first. Because of his illness, the studio initially wanted to get rid of him, but Streep, whom he was dating at the time, and Cimino threatened to walk away if they did. He was also uninsurable, and according to Streep, De Niro paid for his insurance because he wanted him in the film. This was his last film, as he died shortly after filming wrapped. Cazale never saw the finished film.

(Source: richardgere, via adeerhunter)

The Thing | John Carpenter | 1981
Second draft screenplay for the 1982 film. Based on John W. Campbell’s 1938 novella “Who Goes There?” Working copy belonging to uncredited crew member Jim Elkins, with his name in holograph ink on the front wrapper.A parasitic extraterrestrial lands on Earth, taking on the forms of its prey and slowly assimilating the members of an American Antarctic outpost until the outpost itself is destroyed. Shot over the course of three months on both artificially frozen sound stages in Los Angeles and on location in Alaska and British Columbia. Though the film is now considered a cult horror classic, “The Thing” struggled at the box office, opening on the heels of both “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” and Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner.”Gray studio wrappers, noted as SECOND DRAFT SCREENPLAY on the front wrapper, marked production No. 00477, dated March 4, 1981. Title page present, dated March 4, 1981, noted as Second Draft Screenplay, with credits for screenwriter Lancaster, director Carpenter, producers Foster, Turman, Cohen, and Stark, and novella writer Campbell, seen here under his pseudonym Don A. Stuart. 124 leaves, mechanically reproduced on yellow stock. Pages about Fine, wrapper Very Good plus bound with three gold brads.

The Thing | John Carpenter | 1981

Second draft screenplay for the 1982 film. Based on John W. Campbell’s 1938 novella “Who Goes There?” Working copy belonging to uncredited crew member Jim Elkins, with his name in holograph ink on the front wrapper.

A parasitic extraterrestrial lands on Earth, taking on the forms of its prey and slowly assimilating the members of an American Antarctic outpost until the outpost itself is destroyed. Shot over the course of three months on both artificially frozen sound stages in Los Angeles and on location in Alaska and British Columbia. Though the film is now considered a cult horror classic, “The Thing” struggled at the box office, opening on the heels of both “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” and Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner.”

Gray studio wrappers, noted as SECOND DRAFT SCREENPLAY on the front wrapper, marked production No. 00477, dated March 4, 1981. Title page present, dated March 4, 1981, noted as Second Draft Screenplay, with credits for screenwriter Lancaster, director Carpenter, producers Foster, Turman, Cohen, and Stark, and novella writer Campbell, seen here under his pseudonym Don A. Stuart. 124 leaves, mechanically reproduced on yellow stock. Pages about Fine, wrapper Very Good plus bound with three gold brads.

(Source: royalbks, via adeerhunter)